What Does 'Yellowstone's Popularity Say About America?
2024/01/02

Taylor Sheridan's Western drama series Yellowstone has quickly become a hit with audiences, solidifying Sheridan's position as one of the most sought-after creators in Hollywood. The show resonates with viewers because it tells working-class stories and gives a voice to often-overlooked rural communities.

Despite initial mixed-to-negative reviews, the show's popularity has skyrocketed, making it one of the most-watched shows in America. Sheridan, known for films like Sicario and Hell or High Water, seems to have a knack for creating compelling Western and blue-collar dramas.

In addition to Yellowstone, he has created successful projects like Mayor of Kingstown and Tulsa King. The success of these shows proves that audiences love what Sheridan brings to the table. Yellowstone takes place in Montana's Paradise Valley, showcasing the American myth of the West. The appeal of the show lies in its exploration of themes like freedom, justice, and the consequences of violence. The Western genre, with its focus on basic human ideas, has always been popular, and Yellowstone continues that tradition.

Another reason for Yellowstone's popularity is its focus on the working class. In recent years, there has been a growing demand for stories about everyday people living in rural areas. Shows like Friday Night Lights and Longmire have proven that there is an audience for working-class, rural stories.

Yellowstone gives these viewers a chance to see their lives represented on screen. The show's success has had a political impact as well. While some may view it as a conservative fantasy, the show's depiction of conservative values resonates with many viewers.

Overall, Yellowstone's popularity reflects the enduring appeal of the Western genre and the desire for stories that represent the working-class and rural communities. With Sheridan's other projects in the works and more shows following in Yellowstone's footsteps, the series is sure to leave a lasting legacy in Hollywood.

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